New Nuage system for production firm Dizale

Woensdag 26 augustus 2015, 13:19 • 2202 keer gelezen

Based in Plouhernel, France, production facility Dizale is reportedly enjoying a steady increase in its dubbing and audio post workload, and so to help deliver these projects as efficiently as possible, the team has taken delivery of a Yamaha Nuage post-production system. Founded in 1998 and supported by the Regional Council of Brittany, Dizale specialises in dubbing films, television series and animation into Breton.

New Nuage system for production firm Dizale
Beyond this, the firm also works on a range of broadcast audio projects, including post-production, soundtracks and subtitling. With this side of the business continuing to expand, the company needed to upgrade its facilities, and therefore opted to have Nuage at the heart of its facility.

"Our continuing expansion meant that we needed to update our systems. We wanted to invest in a state-of-the-art control surface," said Dizale sound engineer Jean-Mari Ollivier. "We looked at all the available products and found that Nuage was the ideal solution for both what we needed and our budget."

Featuring dedicated Yamaha control and interface hardware, along with Steinberg's Nuendo software – version 7 of which was launched earlier this year, and will be reviewed in the September issue of AMI – Nuage is a purpose-built system designed to offer 'unprecedented creativity, flexibility and audio quality, seamlessly uniting production processes that require a multitude of devices, connections and interfaces in traditional systems', Yamaha says.

The Nuage system will also assist with Dizale's role in training engineers for all roles in the audio production and dubbing industry by giving them hands-on experience of new technology.

"We produce all the finished files here, so we weren't limited to choosing any particular software. Steinberg Nuendo provides all the facilities we need, so the combination of Nuage and Nuendo is the perfect pairing to help enhance our productivity," Ollivier concluded.